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MCCHORD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash.--
Members of the base honor guard give the U.S. flag the first of 10 distinctive folds recently during a practice session designed to ensure ceremonial procedures are accurate and comply with all applicable instructions. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Abner Guzman)


Practice, discipline highlight honor guard duty: Airmen train to be tangible examples of military service
Airmen in base honor guard operate under a microscope each time they are out in the community on a detail. Their movements are crisp and in perfect unison. Their uniforms are neatly pressed and their shoes shine like they're brand new. But one slight misstep can ruin everything. "One word describes [our performance] -- perfection," said honor guard
0 4/13
2007
Default Air Force Logo Stress management: Keep things in perspective
Stress can work for you and against you. It is the bodies' reaction to a new situation, whether it is welcome or unwelcome, said staff psychologist Capt. Michael Jones, 62nd Medical Operations Squadron. When the heart beats faster, the body produces adrenaline. When adrenaline is produced, people breathe more rapidly, are more alert and may
0 4/13
2007
MCCHORD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash.-- The nose wheel trainers designed by Master Sgt. Barry Buchmiller, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, pictured here, will save the Air Force money by freeing up C-17 Globemaster IIIs from ground training. The trainers are used to help Airmen learn how to change the wheels on the nose landing gear assembly.
(U.S. Air Force Photo)
Idea nets AMXS Airman $10,000
Master Sgt. Barry Buchmiller, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, was just looking to make good use of a part that was going to be turned into scrap metal. While Sergeant Buchmiller was a member of the 373rd Training Squadron, Detachment 12, he found out that the squadron was discarding an old nose gear trainer because the squadron was in the
0 4/13
2007
Brent Carney, 62nd Medical Operations Squadron, adjusts a food pyramid display at the Health and Wellness Center Tuesday.  Mr. Carney, the new base dietician, has been a dietician for 18 years. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Tyler Hemstreet) McChord welcomes new dietician
Airmen, dependents and retirees have a new resource on their side to help them eat healthy and stay fit. Brent Carney, a registered dietician for 18 years, was recently hired to work in the 62nd Medical Group's Health and Wellness Center. He will work with Airmen, spouses, retirees and children and help to promote a variety of nutritional
0 3/30
2007
Default Air Force Logo McChord Airmen travel ‘down under’ to train Aussies
The one-month trip to Australia was a temporary duty assignment that most Airmen only dream of. It provided a chance to take in the local culture, visit sandy beaches, eat exotic cuisine and even try out one of the country's most popular sports -- cricket. But it was also a chance for four Airmen from the 373rd Training Squadron, Detachment 12, and
0 3/30
2007
Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Michael Lovett, 62nd Airlift Wing, reads from a near acuity chart during a visit to the Optometry clinic Tuesday March 15, 2007 while Optometrist Major Christine Stabile, 62nd Medical Operations Squadron, uses add lenses to measure for bifocals. (U.S. Air Force photo/Abner Guzman) Good looking out: Optometry keeps Airmen's eyes on the mission
When Airmen can see everything clearly, focusing on the mission becomes that much easier. The 62nd Medical Group's optometry flight makes sure Airmen can do just that each time they step through the doors. The flight serves between 300 and 400 active duty Airmen, retirees, dependents, Reservists and military members from other branches who need the
0 3/30
2007
MCCHORD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- Staff Sgt. Ronald West prepares for the fitness improvement class by straighting a row of spin bikes  March 9, 2007 at the fitness center annex. Sergeant West is a certified personal trainer assigned to the 62nd Services Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Abner Guzman) Five-star fitness: Two 62nd SVS programs earn highest grades
The 62nd Services Squadron recently earned Five Star status for its outdoor recreation and fitness programs here. The award, which is given by the Air Force Services Agency, provides annual recognition and acknowledgement for bases that have reached the highest standard of achievement in all aspects of program management, AFSA officials said. The
0 3/19
2007
MCMURDO STATION, Antarctica - Cargo is transported from a McChord C-17 Globemaster III to an awaiting LC-130 Hercules operated by the New York Air National Guard Nov. 14, 2006, near here. U.S. Air Force Photo/ By 1st Lt Erika Yepsen McChord wraps up Operation Deep Freeze
McChord C-17s, along with ski-equipped New York Air National Guard LC-130 Hercules' redeployed from Christchurch, New Zealand, recently wrapping up the 2006 to 2007 season of Operation Deep Freeze. Operation Deep Freeze is a unique, joint and total force mission that has supported the National Science Foundation and U.S. Antarctic Program since
0 3/19
2007
MCCHORD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. -- Master Sgt. Charles Edwards, 62nd Maintenance Squadron, plots the measurements taken from an original aircraft part in order to reproduce a mirror image and replace a damaged aircraft part recently in the metals technology shop located in Bldg. 745. (U.S. Air Force photo by Abner Guzman) Metals technology: When a part is not available, they make it from scratch
When troops, Humvees, helicopters and ammunition need to be airlifted, maintenance and aircrews don't have time to wait around for the delivery of a bracket that helps anchor a pallet to the floor of a C-17 Globemaster III. Instead, they look to the 62nd Maintenance Squadron's metals technology shop to manufacture the piece. Since the shop is the
0 3/09
2007
Default Air Force Logo Flying crew chiefs: Airmen provide peace of mind, support to aircraft, aircrews during missions
Though living out of a duffel bag for weeks on end, sleeping on anything but a mattress and being away from home for extended amounts of time aren't exactly conditions that can make a job easy, they are issues flying crew chiefs deal with on a routine basis. And that's usually just fine with them, said Senior Airman Kenneth Wimer, 62nd Aircraft
0 3/09
2007
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