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Maintenance Airman delivers airpower

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, troubleshoots the flight controls of a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft Nov. 3, 2016, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Agoun recently discovered a faulty C-17 heads up display assembly control panel saving the Air Force more than $390,000. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jacob Jimenez)

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, troubleshoots the flight controls of a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft Nov. 3, 2016, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Agoun recently discovered a faulty C-17 heads up display assembly control panel saving the Air Force more than $390,000. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jacob Jimenez)

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, inspects refuel panel on a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft Nov. 3, 2016, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Agoun was recognized by his supervision for identifying and resolving an engine start problem on a C-17. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jacob Jimenez)

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, inspects refuel panel on a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft Nov. 3, 2016, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Agoun was recognized by his supervision for identifying and resolving an engine start problem on a C-17. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jacob Jimenez)

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, poses in front of a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft Nov. 3, 2016, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Agoun was selected as the 62nd AMXS Spotlight for outstanding performance.(U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jacob Jimenez)

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, poses in front of a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft Nov. 3, 2016, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Agoun was selected as the 62nd AMXS Spotlight for outstanding performance.(U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jacob Jimenez)

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. --

 

With little more than a year on station, one Team McChord maintainer made quite an impression on his leadership.

 

Senior Airman Jamal Agoun, 62nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron instrument and flight control systems apprentice, has saved the day more than once, allowing aircrews to launch on time.

 

“His enormous intrinsic motivation to help others has strengthened his dedication to service in the Air Force,” said Staff Sgt. Amanda Tissue, 62nd AMXS instrument and flight control systems journeyman. “He is an outstanding instrument flight control systems apprentice.”

 

Earlier this year, Agoun displayed his expertise and job knowledge when he identified a faulty piece of aircraft equipment on a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft.

 

His exceptional system knowledge enabled him to discover a shorted C-17 heads up display assembly control panel, said Tissue. This prevented the replacement of a HUD assembly, saving the Air Force $390,000 and more than 30 man hours of work.

 

"I try to show attention to detail, and I like to do things the right way the first time,” Said Agoun. “By overlooking something small like this could cause issues later and a crew to get stuck somewhere.”  

         

Ensuring the success of one flight already, Agoun also recently helped another crew get airborne.

 

“Senior Airman Agoun was essential when he assisted a specialist with an engine start problem,” said Tissue. “His quick actions expedited the replacement of a damaged ignitor plug enabling the airlift of 2 AH-64 Apaches to Baghram Airfield.”

 

Although the engine problem was outside of Agoun’s career field, he offered assistance to help get the aircraft operational.

 

“I’ve never been trained on engines, but know about them from talking to people,” said Agoun. “I just happened to be out there when it happened.”

 

According to Agoun, providing a helping hand was the right thing to do.

 

“If I was him I would appreciate someone offering to help me,” Said Agoun. "The number one priority is to ensure the jets get in the air."

   

Besides wanting to do what he feels is right, Agoun said he also wants his work to speak for itself.

 

"My work is a reflection of me,” said Agoun. “I like going to work and like seeing people who know me by my work in a good way.”

 

According to Agoun, he is knowledgeable in his job, because of practice.

 

"I relate my job to football, I used to work hard during practice and games were easy,” said Agoun. “When it comes to training I apply myself and stress myself training, so I don't have to when I'm on the job."

 

Agoun’s supervision have taken note of his work ethic, said Tissue.

 

“Senior Airman Agoun is an extremely well-rounded individual,” said Tissue. “He arrived on the base ready to be the best at his job, serve in the community, and lead his fellow Airmen, and he has done exactly that. I am super excited to see how far he can go and the things that he can achieve.”