HomeNewsArticle Display

5th ASOS fires on all cylinders during Yakima FTX

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron holds his position during a small unit tactics exercise at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. Small unit tactics are used for the combat deployment of platoons in a particular strategic and logistic environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron holds his position during a small unit tactics exercise at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. Small unit tactics are used for the combat deployment of platoons in a particular strategic and logistic environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron opens a skedco litter at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. During the Over the course of their week-long field training exercise, TACP Airmen conducted various medical practices in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets for varying mission requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron opens a skedco litter at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. During the Over the course of their week-long field training exercise, TACP Airmen conducted various medical practices in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets for varying mission requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron fires an M2 .50 caliber weapon system during a field training exercise at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 26, 2021. The 5th ASOS fired approximately 60,000 rounds of M4, M2, M249, M240, and MK19 ammunition during their week long field training exercise, ensuring Air Combat Command’s warfighting capability and presence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron fires an M2 .50 caliber weapon system during a field training exercise at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 26, 2021. The 5th ASOS fired approximately 60,000 rounds of M4, M2, M249, M240, and MK19 ammunition during their week long field training exercise, ensuring Air Combat Command’s warfighting capability and presence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron applies a tourniquet to his wingman at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. During the week-long field training exercise, TACP Airmen conducted various medical practices in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets for varying mission requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron applies a tourniquet to his wingman at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. During the week-long field training exercise, TACP Airmen conducted various medical practices in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets for varying mission requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron examines a 5.56mm ammunition blank shell at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. Blank ammunition is often used by the 5th ASOS for exercise purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron examines a 5.56mm ammunition blank shell at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. Blank ammunition is often used by the 5th ASOS for exercise purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron reviews small unit tactics with TACP Airmen at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. Small unit tactics are used for the combat deployment of platoons in a particular strategic and logistic environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force tactical air control party Airman with the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron reviews small unit tactics with TACP Airmen at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 28, 2021. Small unit tactics are used for the combat deployment of platoons in a particular strategic and logistic environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force 5th Air Support Operations Squadron tactical air control party Airman fires an M4 weapon system at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 27, 2021. The 5th ASOS held a week-long field training exercise to become more proficient in infiltration and exfiltration, small arms marksmanship, heavy weapons utilization, small unit tactics, and force on force full mission profiles in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets to meet varying mission requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

A U.S. Air Force 5th Air Support Operations Squadron tactical air control party Airman fires an M4 weapon system at Yakima Training Center, Washington, April 27, 2021. The 5th ASOS held a week-long field training exercise to become more proficient in infiltration and exfiltration, small arms marksmanship, heavy weapons utilization, small unit tactics, and force on force full mission profiles in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets to meet varying mission requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Callie Norton)

YAKIMA TRAINING CENTER, Wash. --

The 5th Air Support Operations Squadron, located at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, conducted a week-long field training exercise here, April 26-30, 2021.

The exercise was an all-encompassing training to become more proficient in infiltration and exfiltration, small arms marksmanship, heavy weapons utilization, small unit tactics, and force-on-force full mission profiles in order to meet changing tactical requirements and advance ground skill sets for varying mission requirements.

The exercise also emphasized integrating the entire squadron to ensure combat mission support Airmen understand firsthand what the tactical air control party mission entails.

“The goal of this FTX was to bring everyone together, whether you are a TACP or combat mission support Airman, and teach basic combat line and ground skills,” said Tech. Sgt. Eian Andrew, 5th ASOS noncommissioned officer in charge of B-flight and one of the organizers of the FTX.

Day one focused on heavy weapons familiarization with live-fire iterations, shooting the M-4, M-240, M-249, M-2 and MK-19 weapon systems. Personnel received training on function checks, how to clear the weapon, barrel control and practice dry and live-fire of each weapon.

On day two, 5th ASOS Airmen used M-4s to exercise their long-range marksmanship skills. Following dry runs and weapon familiarization, the team held live-fire competitions for who could hit the longest shot, as well as random pop-up targets approximately 800 meters away. 

“Since our personnel carry them daily in combat, repetition handling the M-4 is crucial to giving Airmen the confidence and understanding they need to operate it safely and effectively,” Andrew said.

Approximately 60,000 rounds of ammunition were used throughout the exercise.

In addition to weapons utilization, combat life-saving skills were also a large part of the exercise. All Airmen were trained on various medical practices including body and litter carries, wound dressing and tourniquet application. 

“My goal is for the Airmen to walk away knowing they understand these tools, how to use them, can do it safely, effectively and save a life,” said Nick Chavis, a trainer tasked with providing medical instruction throughout the week.

The 5th ASOS put their weapons and medical training to use throughout the remainder of the FTX by practicing small unit tactics.

Each platoon moved through an open field, cleared out an assault area and raided a compound exercising close quarters combat as a team.

“Every TACP integrates into an Army combat force, whether that’s a platoon size, fire team or even a division,” Andrew said. “Understanding what happens on the ground helps build their abilities to integrate into any Army element and serve them better as a [joint terminal attack controller].”

On the final day, teams were provided an exercise mission with intel that there was a high value individual located in the area. The platoon’s objective was to plan where to maneuver, how to go about clearing the village, locate the individual and exit the village safely against the other platoons.

“This brings us all together as a team,” Andrew said. “It exposes our CMS personnel to foundational skills in this career field, and for our TACPs, it also helps bridge the gap from our young JTACs and more experienced JTACs.”

The 5th ASOS has held FTX’s in the past involving all squadron personnel, however, they usually are tasked to focus on their own jobs throughout.

“This exercise is different because it requires all career fields to collaborate regardless of their duty title or previous experience,” Andrew said. “It builds that working relationship and gives them the confidence to show up to any unit and support where needed.”

The 5th ASOS plans to hold another FTX in the fall that will build on what the Airmen learned this week.

USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.