627th CES trains to lead the way

627th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen use their land navigation training during their internal Capstone exercise April 20, 2017 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. The capstone, which consisted of an evaluation where they simulated being in a deployed environment and had to build a base from the ground up in a contested environment, was used as an internal evaluation method tool to measure readiness for a year’s worth of contingency training. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Naomi Shipley)

627th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen use their land navigation training during their internal Capstone exercise April 20, 2017 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. The capstone, which consisted of an evaluation where they simulated being in a deployed environment and had to build a base from the ground up in a contested environment, was used as an internal evaluation method tool to measure readiness for a year’s worth of contingency training. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Naomi Shipley)

627th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen use their air base defense training during their internal Capstone exercise April 20, 2017 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. In the scenario several unidentified and hostile foreigners attempted to gain access to the base. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Naomi Shipley)

627th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen use their air base defense training during their internal Capstone exercise April 20, 2017 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. In the scenario several unidentified and hostile foreigners attempted to gain access to the base. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Naomi Shipley)

627th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen simulate experiencing an attack by a suicide bomber during their internal Capstone exercise April 20, 2017 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. The capstone was a validation of the unit’s last several training days for the 627th CES have included land navigation training and air base defense training. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Naomi Shipley)

627th Civil Engineer Squadron Airmen simulate experiencing an attack by a suicide bomber during their internal Capstone exercise April 20, 2017 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. The capstone was a validation of the unit’s last several training days for the 627th CES have included land navigation training and air base defense training. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Naomi Shipley)

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. --

The 627th Civil Engineer Squadron completed their internal Capstone exercise April 20 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., which consisted of an evaluation where they simulated being in a deployed environment and had to build a base from the ground up.

The squadron used this Capstone as an internal evaluation method tool to measure readiness for a year’s worth of contingency training.

2nd Lt. Jessica Rothmeier, 627th CES project manager and lead Wing Inspection Team for the exercise, said the intent of the exercise was to demonstrate their readiness.

“The main drive of this exercise is readiness,” said Rothmeier . “The commander’s intent was to build on our last exercise. The last one was more of a planning stage and the main purpose for today was sight validation.”

In a real world scenario, if civil engineers were establishing a bare base, they essentially have to build it to function at whatever location was necessary.

“When we gets boots on the ground, first, we’re trying to evaluate the current status of the ground, location and topography,” said Rothmeier. “Then were going to set up basic infrastructure for the site.”

The last several training days for the 627th CES have included land navigation training and air base defense training.

Master Sgt. Carlo Aguon, 627th CES branch manager and command and control for the exercise, said the capstone is a great opportunity to teach, especially for the newer Airmen. 

“Our scenario simulates as if we were going to a deployed location, so it is as realistic as possible,” said Aguon. “We try to give them that realism so when they do deploy they have a sense of familiarity.”

The added benefits to the exercise is that they are all learning in a controlled environment.

“It is controlled, but realistic training for them,” said Aguon.

Overall, the exercise was a success.

“This is a culmination of that training and an evaluation of those skills,” said Rothmeier. “Overall, they did a good job, but we’re still compiling our observations.”